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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 5
CSPAN 4
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
venue. the queen mary, of course. [laughter] let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington d.c. a huge amount of people gathered on the washington mall. 2009 it was all away from the capital of a way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot
's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c. to be a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and there of course for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also
'm not going to say it. >> you are in our hearts. you can tell us what's going on in washington. what's going on in washington? >> bad dynamics. >> really? >> those of us optimistic there'd be a deal. the white house has blasted boehner's offer as much as the republicans blasted the president's. people like to say, oh, they're going to posture, but behind the scenes they're working it out. they're not. >> i hear chuck todd reported yesterday behind the scenes a top aide to barack obama, willie geist. and this -- i don't -- i'm not really good at reading the tea leaves. maybe this is good, maybe this is bad. but a top obama aide yesterday told chuck todd that if the republicans -- if these republicans were in power when abraham lincoln were there, there would still be slavery. does that help the process move along? or does it hurt? i don't really know -- >> reading between the lines. >> i know one direction, i know boy bands. >> reading between the lines, that's probably a bad omen. we do have four weeks, though. >> that's bad. >> absolutely. we have, i believe, we have 27 negotiating days. un
of ours from our radio studio and t.v. studio here on capitol here in washington, d.c. a new poll shows that the most unpopular senator in the entire country is republican leader mitch mcconnell. he's got only 37% favorable rating in his own home state of kentucky, but mcconnell says, that's not true. and he accuses, believe it or not. he accuses president obama of cooking the polls. what a lose her. he's in total denial. yeah. have you ever heard him speak? have you ever looked at him? no wonder he is so be popular. we will talk about that and mosh. first, standing by, lisa ferguson with today's news update. hi, lisa. >> hey, bill. good morning everyone. big news of the day, susan rice is choosing to withdraw her name for consideration of secretary of state. president obama will meet with the u.n. ambassador at the whitehouse today. she made a surprise announcement yesterday and told nbc's brian williams she did wanted any confirmation hearing to destract from president obama's agend ae. she said those of you who know me i am a fighter but not at the cost
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
, and sort of a story that had gotten lost in all the politics in washington. >> host: well, bob, we have to comment as an employee of usa today, comment on usa tomorrow. >> guest: and the day after. i should thank sarah for the plug for that. what we did, the newspaper is, i think, in september was 30 years old so a a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like in 30 years from now, which would be, what are we talking about? 2042. you're better at math than i am. i -- anyway, they made predictions, and they talked about what it means for their industries, and we put out a little tab, and now that tab, tab or little sheet, is now an e-book, which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99 or $2.99. they have not really taken off yet. these short form, somewhere in between a book and a amazing, byliner does a lot of good ones, and amazon has been doing them. they can be posted almost immediately, and they sell for -- $2 or $4, maybe more. a few made the best seller list. some have been fiction. amy tan wrote a story called "too lo
] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had an abusive ex-husband eventually i found an article in "the new york times" about a lot of connections. obama writes about a new girlfriend. he is going up to her family's estate. this wealthy area in connecticut. >> host: at columbia university, a classmate of the president, to be honest, he had never had many black friends, he said. i saw that switch happened most markedly during the period that i was most close to him. barack obama was the most liberal person i ever met in terms of instructing his own identity. his achievement was really an achievement in the modern world. >> guest: beenu mahmood was one of a group of pakistani friends that barack obama had. they shared with him the he was comfortable that these guys. at columbia law school, they were very good guys. it is true that obama did his best. when i interview president obama in the oval office, he talked about the supporters in new york. but he started to m
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)